Conrad Murray Tells His Story, Part Three… by Uinterview

Conrad Murray, who had served as Michael Jackson’s personal physician in the years leading up to his death, was the one to find him unresponsive in his bedroom at Neverland Ranch. Murray details Jackson’s final night in part 3 of his exclusive interview with uInterview.

Conrad Murray’s On Michael Jackson’s Death

While preparing for his London tour, Jackson’s insomnia was at its most debilitating. Only heavy medication, like anesthetic Propofol, helped him sleep. The King of Pop was also, according to Murray, addicted to Demerol, and was in the throes of withdrawal – unbeknownst to Murray at the time. On Jackson’s last night alive, Murray sought to help him sleep by giving him a relatively small dosage of Propofol.

“I gave him 25 mg of Propofol, which is so minuscule I would not expect anyone to have any kind sedation from that,” Murray told uInterview. Even still, Murray says he monitored Jackson’s breathing for more than a half hour before taking his leave to see to other matters. “When I left his bedside to conduct business, I was comfortable. I thought I had did everything reasonable. There was no way he could get into trouble.”

WATCH: Conrad Murray Tells His Story, Part Two: Michael Jackson’s Addictions

When Murray returned to Jackson’s bedroom later in the day, he was stunned to see that he had moved – and that he showed no signs of life.

“Michael was not on the pillow as I had left him, he had moved. I picked up the pace and got to him and realized he was not breathing,” said Murray, who proceeded to check his pulse wherever he could. “He was completely lifeless. As a cardiologist, I immediately initiated resuscitative measures.” Murray performed CPR, attempted to ventilate him with an Ambu bag and then resorted to mouth-to-mouth. “I always wondered if I could ever had the heart to do this,” Murray said of giving mouth-to-mouth, something he’d never done before. “I did not hesitate to do that.”

Chaos ensued at Neverland as Jackson remained lifeless, with Murray futilely trying to revive him. Head of security Michael Amir was no where to be found. When he was, it was still some time before anyone appeared. Desperate, Murray left Jackson’s side.

“I had to stop, run out of the room, down the back stairs, get to the landing, and call out to the chef, ‘Get security! Get Prince! Get help!'” Murray detailed, explaining that he called for the eldest of Jackson’s kids because he could lead help to Jackson’s bedroom. When security arrived, Murray said, “I did give an order right then to call 911, which he’d done. He took a while after he’d taken the children out, and came back to the room and I said, ‘Did you call 911.’ He said he hadn’t done it, he was gonna do it then. That’s when the 911 call was made.”

WATCH: Conrad Murray Tells His Story, Part One: Meeting Michael Jackson

When paramedics finally arrived, they were ready to follow Los Angeles protocol, calling Jackson’s death due to the duration of time that he had been down, explained Murray. Murray claims that he convinced them not to call it, and to allow him to assume care of the singer, whom he went with to the hospital.

“Michael Jackson was worked with for over and hour at UCLA, and they didn’t do that just because they wanted to perform CPR and heroics for Michael Jackson. They performed resuscitative measures on Michael because he had signs of life,” according to Murray. “Not strong enough to generate a pulse, but the heart was contracting. I was very hopeful…. They continued for a while then it was over an hour, and by then they did everything that they could — they pronounced him.”

Murray, to this day, though he has speculated about the circumstances that led to Jackson’s death, says that he does not know what happened in the critical time that elapsed between when he last saw him alive and when he found him dead.

“I don’t know what happened, that’s the one thing,” Murray told uInterview. “All I can say is that when I came back Mr. Jackson was not in the same position, there was no signs of life.”


Q: Did you give Jackson Propofol? -

I gave him 25 mg of Propofol, which is so miniscule I would not expect anyone to have any kind of sedation from that. So, when Michael drifted off to sleep, I was of the opinion — finally — fatigue had caught up with him. I was of the opinion that by him seeing the white milky substance in the syringe was the placebo effect I was looking for, just to see if he would be able to relax and go to sleep. But, he did sleep, and interestingly, when Michael Jackson was treated with Propofol fusions in the past, like a continuous drip overnight, he would be a snorer. In this case he was not. So I sat down and monitored Jackson through a minimum of 35 minutes before I left, and that was three times what it was required for any kind of side effect or complication from any dose of Propofol because Propofol is its own antidote. When I left his bedside to conduct business, I was comfortable. I thought I had did everything reasonable. There was no way he could get into trouble. I would wake him up and I’ll say good-bye I’m going home. But, at least he would have gotten a little bit of rest because he had to go to rehearsals anytime shortly in the afternoon that day. So, I went away, conducted my business, spoke to people on the phone and then I was coming back after a while to Michael’s room. Things were not the same. It was shockingly different. Michael was not on the pillow as I left him, he had moved, I picked up the pace and got to him and realized he was not breathing, checked for pulses, in his radial pulses, his brachial pulses, I checked his carotid artery pulses, there was no breath sounds. He was completely lifeless. As a cardiologist, I immediately initiated resuscitative measures.

Q: Do you think Jackson self-administered extra doses in your absence? -

I don’t know what happened, that’s the one thing — and I don’t want to speculate in my absence. All I can say is that when I came back Mr. Jackson was not in the same position, there was no signs of life.

Q: What did you do after seeing him unconscious? -

I did CPR on Michael and started with an Ambu bag to ventilate him, but that of course is not effective and I did something that I’ve never done before. In the effort to help him, I did mouth to mouth resuscitation. I always wondered if I could ever have the heart to do this. I did not hesitate to do that. Once security made the call to Michael Amir, who was head of security, he was not at home at the house. He did not pick up the call; made matters worse. I left a message saying, ‘I have an emergency I needed security to call me.’ Michael Amir called back after some time had passed. During that period of time, I was the single operator trying to resuscitate Mr. Jackson. After that call, still nobody showed up. I kept looking at the door, I’m still doing CPR by myself; no one came to the door, no one knocked, nothing. I couldn’t understand why there was a delay, so from that I had to stop, run out of the room, down the back stairs, get to the landing and call out to the chef, ‘Get security! Get Prince! Get help!’ Prince was mentioned because he was the biggest of all the children. Security is not allowed in the house. It’s a 14,000 square foot, three level storage home. How would they have known where to go? Bounce from room to room until they figure it out? They needed some help. The kids knew exactly where it was because when security arrived later the kids were right at their feet. At that time, when I saw the children, I had security immediately escort them out while I continued to do CPR. I did give an order right then to call 911, which he’d done. He took a while after he’d taken the children out, and came back to the room and I said, ‘Did you call 911?’ He said he hadn’t done it, he was gonna do it then. That’s when the 911 call was made.

Q: Why did you perform CPR on Jackson in his bed and not on the floor? -

He had an IV line going into his leg. He had trouble with his veins. He had very fibrotic veins, it was difficult to find places to put IVs on Michael. So, knowing that I did not want that IV to be lost and I knew that if I tried to lift Michael up by myself that IV would be gone and it could be near impossible to find. Well, when paramedics came into the room and offered to assist him to move from the bed I told them and I warned them. Nonetheless, three paramedics moving one person could not keep the line in place and the line became non functional. There is a rule in medicine that I follow for cardiac arrest patients; if a patient is down for every minute that they’re not attended to, there’s a ten percent chance of mortality. So, you take it very simply. What if Michael Jackson was down for 20 minutes before I discovered him? His chance of death was 200 percent. I asked them to allow me to put in a central line, which I could easily have placed in his femoral vein, left or right. I could have placed it in his internal jugular vein for them, whatever they wanted I can do it because I place hundreds of that per year. I’m an interventional cardiologist. But, they were taking orders from UCLA Emergency Room physicians. They kept poking and going every where and couldn’t find a vein. Finally, by the luck of the draw, somebody got a vein in his neck, where I could have placed it in seconds and when they placed that tube in his line, the catheter in his neck, it was 25 minutes later after they arrived. But, there’s a protocol in Los Angeles — if after 20 minutes on the scene of an acute decompensation patient requiring heroics — you call the case — you just pronounce the patient. Now, that was a problem for me. Are you crazy? You did nothing and you want to pronounce him because of a protocol time. Hell no. I asked them to call UCLA and I spoke to the doctor and I said, ‘I’m gonna assume care for Mr. Jackson, would you transfer?’ She agreed. I said ‘Prepare for him he’s coming,’ and I took him to UCLA. When he got to UCLA, Michael Jackson was worked with for over an hour at UCLA and they didn’t do that just because they wanted to perform CPR and heroics for Michael Jackson. They performed resuscitative measures on Michael because he had signs of life. An echocardiogram was done on Michael and when you look at the images his heart was contracting — but weakly. Not strong enough to generate a pulse, but the heart was contracting. I was very hopeful. So, they continued to do CPR with heroics and 20 minutes after they repeated the test, his heart was still doing the same thing. They continued for a while then it was over an hour, and by then they did everything that they could — they pronounced him.