Conrad Murray Tells His Story, Part Two… by Uinterview

Michael Jackson‘s former physician Conrad Murray delves into the details of Jackson’s many addictions – one of which may have killed him – in part 2 of his exclusive video interview with uInterview.com.

Conrad Murray On Michael Jackson’s Addictions

While Jackson’s dependence on pain medications and powerful anesthetics is relatively well known, less known was Jackson’s fixation on women who were worryingly thin. As a part of Jackson’s inner circle, Murray got a window into the pop legend’s peculiar tastes.

“As guys, as we read through certain magazines that he enjoyed looking at, we would sometimes compare the various models and we would take a pic and try to say well, ‘I can guess which one you like versus which one he would like.’ He also always ended up with the thinnest girl, but eventually we figured out in discussion that he liked very very anorexic women,” Murray told uInterview. He added, “If you showed him a woman that looked like a bone, but was a great looking gal, then he would ask for her to be half the size of that bone to be even better. We laughed about that a lot.”

On an ordinary day, Jackson struggled with insomnia and would, according to Murray, often treat that with over-the-counter pills. But, when he was preparing for a tour or in the middle of it, his insomnia worsened. To treat it, he sought the help of physicians who were able to prescribe him powerful drugs. When Jackson died, a Propofol overdose was listed as the cause of death. Murray thinks the truth is more complicated.

“Michael Jackson was using Propofol for decades. But, many doctors that worked with him were anesthesiologists and if you look back at the history and look back at other things you will probably find that that is the case,” Murray explained. “One of the things that I learned, not just Propofol, because Propofol is not addictive, it’s not a dependent agent, it’s not a street drug, it has no value, nobody would pay for that.”

“The drug that he had was an opioid, similar to what took the life of Prince. I think Prince was using Fentanyl and another substance, but Michael Jackson was injected 51 times in the last 60 days of his life by Dr. Arnold Klein with Demerol,” Murray went on.

WATCH: Conrad Murray Tells His Story, Part One: Meeting Michael Jackson

To put Jackson’s dependence on Demerol in perspective, Murray said that a patient with a broken bone who enters the emergency room would be given about 50 mg; Michael Jackson was apparently receiving up to 975 mg a day – in addition to other drugs. Murray claims that he wasn’t the one providing the Demerol for Jackson. That was, according to Murray, all Dr. Klein. But Murray admits that he did know that Jackson had a cache of Propofol from a source the singer wouldn’t reveal.

“He showed me his stash at home, in his bedroom this white sporting bag; the zippers could not even close with bottles,” Murray said. “I asked him, ‘Where you get all that stuff?’ and then jokingly Michael said, ‘If I told you Conrad I would have to kill you.’ But, he was well stocked with Propofol.”

In the end, Murray believes that Jackson had been suffering from a Demerol withdrawal in the days leading up to his death. In an act of desperation, Murray thinks that Jackson reached for the Propofol and unintentionally administered more of the drug than his body, having lost some of its resistance, could tolerate.

“Once he was cut off the substance was no longer in his body and the metabolizer was also gone. So, Michael Jackson was in acute full blown withdrawal unbeknownst to me. What he needed was Demerol and I think the withdrawal stage made him a desperate man and he may have misjudged the risk that he would have taken in my absence and that is what I believe caused his demise,” Murray told uInterview.

NEXT: CONRAD MURRAY ON THE NIGHT MICHAEL JACKSON DIED


Q: Did Jackson prefer anorexic women? -

As guys, as we read through certain magazines that he enjoyed looking at, we would sometimes compare the various models and we would take a pic and try to say well, ‘I can guess which one you like versus which one he would like.’ He also always ended up with the thinnest girl, but eventually we figured out in discussion that he liked very very anorexic women. And, as I stated in my book, if you showed him a woman that looked like a bone, but was a great looking gal, then he would ask for her to be half the size of that bone to be even better. We laughed about that a lot.

Q: Was he addicted to sleeping pills? -

Well, with Michael Jackson, I think you have to go back in the book, you would see that he states that he never had the severity of insomnia as when he was under the pressure preparing for a tour or while he was on the tour. Before that, I think he had some sleep issues, but he would use over the counter or just regularly prescribed medication as needed. But, whenever he was getting ready for a concert tour or was on the tour it was impossible to go to sleep and over the years he was assisted by physicians.

Q: Was Propofol the cause of his death? -

I think if you look back in retrospect — Michael Jackson was using Propofol for decades. But, many doctors that worked with him were anesthesiologists and if you look back at the history and look back at other things you will probably find that that is the case. I was not aware of that until we were investigating the case leading up to a trial, and then all of the information came to me after the fact. One of the things that I learned, not just Propofol, because Propofol is not addictive, it’s not a dependent agent, it’s not a street drug, it has no value, nobody would pay for that.

The drug that he had was an opioid, similar to what took the life of Prince. I think Prince was using Fentanyl and another substance, but Michael Jackson was injected 51 times in the last 60 days of his life by Dr. Arnold Klein with Demerol. Michael Jackson apparently loved Demerol so much that he made a song called “Morphine,” and you could see the words of “Morphine” and how it relates to the Demerol. He was not using that pain medication because he was having pain. It was some history that one discussed in the past about Michael having had an injury with the Pepsi commercial and that may have left him suffering. Well, initially, I’m sure he had to be treated. Was that the inception for the addiction? I don’t know. But, for the three and a half years that Michael and I were friends he never complained to me that he was having pain in his scalp or any kind of pain requiring that type of therapy. Now, if you look at the court records, Dr. Arnold Klein was barred from coming to trial by the judge Michael Pastor — he barred everyone from Arnold Klein’s office to testify but they allowed one thing. They did allow partial medical records to come in of the doctor. And, as you look at the doctor, you would see that the 51 times in the last 60 days were part of his medical records and it shows the doses.

At times, Michael Jackson was receiving up as of 975 mg of Demerol per day combined with Midazolam, which is another drug called Versed. I like to put that into perspective. Let’s say in Manhattan today somebody went to one of the Emergency Rooms for a motor vehicle accident, and there was broken bones or something like that; a doctor can definitely put that patient’s pain to rest by simply giving 50 mg of Demerol, the range is from 50 to 75 and the patient’s pain will be gone, the patient will be asleep and not even realize there was an accident. So, to take 975 mg of that medication shows a huge tolerance — that is where his dependency was — that is his addiction. But, he kept this totally clandestine. I told Michael Jackson that I did not want to use any substance, I didn’t care if he took it or used it before. And when he showed me his stash at home, in his bedroom this white sporting bag; the zippers could not even close with bottles. I asked him, ‘Where you get all that stuff?’ and then jokingly Michael said, ‘If I told you Conrad I would have to kill you.’ But, he was well stocked with Propofol. There was another doctor or a nurse practitioner who was actively giving Michael IV’s before I first came and was treating him on a regular basis — Dr. Cherilyn Lee. She’s a nurse practitioner, but she goes around Los Angeles saying that she’s a doctor. I tried to get her records, I tried to see what she was doing to Michael but he never allowed it. I never could get to Lee.

Q: Was Jackson suffering from withdrawal? -

I think what was happening to Michael is he was going in and out of acute withdrawal. This is why one day he called the doctor who he had once fired when I was not present and described that he was having hot and cold sensation in different parts of his body — those were signs of Demerol withdrawal. You can see that. But, the night that it was almost near impossible, when you saw Michael like he was steadily engaged in movement, like a hamster on the wheel, when he morphed into so many different forms and the stress lines on his face you could see it was almost impossible to get him to sleep. It was 48 to 72 hours after he was cut off from getting Demerol, and I do not know who read him the riot act but it just said that AEG told him that he had to stop. They may have been the ones who were paying his bill. When he died, he left $100,000 worth of bills for cash payments to a pharmacy called Mickey Fine in Beverly Hills. Downstairs was the office of Arnold Klein. Once he was cut off the substance was no longer in his body and the metabolizer was also gone. So, Michael Jackson was in acute full blown withdrawal unbeknownst to me. What he needed was Demerol and I think the withdrawal stage made him a desperate man and he may have misjudged the risk that he would have taken in my absence and that is what I believe caused his demise.