David Boudia, 23, had great success at the 2012 London Games as he became the first American to win a gold medal in the 10-meter platform since Greg Louganis in 1988. Boudia added to his medal collection with a bronze in the 10-meter synchronized diving event alongside diving partner Nick McCrory, 21. These feats came after a disappointing outing in Beijing in 2008 when he failed to earn a medal in his two events—the 10-meter individual and 10-meter synchro events—despite having one of the most technically difficult routines in the entire competition. It was all in good time for Boudia, who unleashed his full potential at the London games.

The Noblesville, Ind., native began diving at the young age of 11 and has been a U.S. diving sensation ever since. Boudia attended Purdue University where he went on to be a six-time NCAA champion, two-time NCAA diver of the year (2009, 2010) and 2011 Big Ten Athlete of the Year. Boudia has also had a stellar international career, earning USA Diving Athlete of the Year in 2008, 2010 and 2011.

Heading into 2012 Boudia exhibited a strong focus that surely helped him become one of the stars of the London Games. “In 2008, there’s lot of perks that I can take away from that event” Boudia told Uinterview exclusively. “And a lot of that had to do with the way I was approaching 2008. It was a lot of focus on what I could gain from the Olympics, so switching that perspective of what was important to me. So now 2012 is just about taking one step at a time and enjoying that journey that I’m on, because it’s going to be gone before I know it and I just want to enjoy it and just be able to have so much support on that."

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Q: What's your workout regimen in preparation for the Olympics? - Uinterview User

Yeah, there are a lot of different cross trainings that I do in diving. A lot of people think that the focus is just inside the pool. But most of my training, I’d say 60%, is outside of the pool and I do a lot of weight lifting, I do a lot of conditioning, I do Pilates and yoga. You know, just to get that diversification, just to get your body right and in motion for what you’re about to do definitely is helpful.

Q: How do you prepare yourself mentally for competition? - Uinterview User

I do a lot of different things to help me get mentally prepared for an event. There is a lot of stuff that goes in behind the scene and a big portion of that is just visualizing my dive, so just closing my eyes and seeing every movement that I do and it helps translate in the pool because once I’m up on that 10 meter platform, I’m up there and I’ve already done the dive 20 times in my head and so it’s just kind of automatic pilot when you’re up there.

Q: What's your diet regimen in preparation for the Games? - Uinterview User

Definitely diving is one of the sports that you have to be really cautious about what you’re putting into your body and so I eat a lot of whole fruits and vegetables, and I just started juicing actually, so you should see my fridge right now, it’s stocked with all sorts of fruits and all sorts of vegetables. But one of the super foods that I eat is blueberries, there is a lot of nutritional value in that and I get a lot of nutrients from that and it really feeds into what my training does. The splurging after the game I think there will be plenty of that. I don’t know if I could put a specific pin point on one thing.

Q: What was it like to train and be teammates with Thomas Finchum? - Uinterview User

Before 2008, Thomas and I trained together for I want to say five or six years and just having him as a teammate is encouraging to know that I have someone who is supporting me the entire way, but it’s also interesting that he is also my competitor. We had a really good dynamic of kind of breaking off. We’re still really good friends and that whole relationship and Thomas is just a good guy who helps and encourages you.

Q: Are you better prepared after competing in the 2008 Olympics? - Uinterview User

Yeah, definitely. In 2008, there’s lot of perks that I can take away from that event. And a lot of that had to with the way I was approaching 2008. It was a lot of focus on what I could gain from the Olympics, so switching that perspective of what was important to me. So now 2012 is just about taking one step at a time and enjoying that journey that I’m on, because it’s going to be gone before I know it and I just want to enjoy it and just be able to have so much support on that.

Q: What is it like to represent the United States in 2012? - Uinterview User

To represent the United States is definitely a huge honor and it’s a big privilege, because you have millions of people back home who are trusting in your responsibility to carry that flag and represent them the way they would want to be represented. It’s a big honor to have the red, white and blue on your back and just represent the United States.