It takes U.S. Olympic boxer Rau’shee Warren 10 seconds to size up his opponent. “I just give them ten seconds of what they're going to do, and then that's when I come out and I let my punches go,” Warren, 25, told Uinterview exclusively. “I let my pride go and I just start letting combinations go, because I've got real fast hands and I move a lot with my feet. I try to give them different looks and different stuff like that, but a lot of times I try to be tricky.”

It is this cunning, quick-thinking ability that has served Warren well throughout his amateur boxing career. Growing up in Cincinnati, Ohio, Warren trained at the same gym as Hall of Fame boxer Aaron Pryor, winning his first fight at the age of eight. From there he went on to be the youngest Olympian to compete at the 2004 Games in Athens.

In addition to winning gold at the 2007 World Amateur Boxing Championships in the flyweight division, Warren is the first boxer to compete in three Olympic Games. “I could have gone professional, but I’m not giving up on my dream. I always had the theory that if you have a dream, chase it. And I’m chasing it,” Warren told NBC Olympics.com. “So now, the third time I’m going back, I’m not giving up. Every second, every minute, I’m not letting go of the gas.”

| Get Uinterview's FREE iPhone App To Record Celebrity Video Questions + Get Daily News Updates here!

Read more about:

Leave a comment


Q: How do you size up an opponent when you enter the boxing ring? - Uinterview User

It takes me ten seconds to figure my opponent out, as far as the way he fights or the way he stands or how he looks. Nine times out of ten, when I go in the ring and they're looking at me, they already know who I am, so I feel like they're about to go at me with their best or come right out of the top and then swing and throw shots at me. So I just give them ten seconds of what they're going to do, and then that's when I come out and I let my punches go. I let my pride go and I just start letting combinations go, because I've got real fast hands and I move a lot with my feet. I try to give them different looks and different stuff like that, but a lot of times I try to be tricky. So far as [when] they try to come out real slow and try to come out real calm and try to bring me into their game plan, I also got a game plan for that too.

Q: How do you get prepared mentally for an event? - Uinterview User

I just plug my iPhone in with my earplugs and turn my music on. Just throw some slow music on, just to keep myself calm, and think about what I did to get here. Then I start thinking about my two kids and thinking about my mom. It kind of motivates me and kind of pushes me. When I'm in the ring it helps me get over that hump. It makes me go into another zone, because they're watching.

Q: What is it like to train with teammate Errol Spence? - Uinterview User

Errol, he's like a brother back home. As far as when we're on the team, when we're in Colorado, we laugh, play, do a lot of stuff, and plus he's a southpaw like me. He got this punch, we tried to give it a name. The way he throws is awkward but the way he lands is powerful, so we're still trying to figure out what name to give that punch. When he throws it overhand, it's a weird step he does. But Errol being on the team, it's great to have him on the team because he can show some of his experience to some of the other teammates. He's been in a lot of fights, he's been to a lot of different countries. He's one of the top prospects, he's one of the guys they've got to watch out for cause on his mind, he's set to win and go. He trains hard every day. Even when we don't have to train, he's out there running ... something I'm supposed to be doing but I'll get it done [laughing].