Cobie Smulders and Guy Pearce star in Andrew Bujalski‘s new off-beat comedy Results, in which they play a pair of personal trainers with a personal history.

Cobie Smulders, Guy Pearce Video Exclusive

“We know they work together and as we get into the film we realize that something has happened, there’s been some hookup, and they’re dealing with sort of the fall out of that, trying to be together as co workers – boss and employee really,” Smulders told uInterview in an exclusive sit-down.

Pearce added, “You get a sense that there was some sort of history, but you don’t kind of know what it is, so I think that makes for an interesting story.”

Eventually, their characters in Results, Kat and Trevor, meet Danny (Kevin Corrigan) – a wealthy, middle-aged man who wants to put his money to use to buy a better physique and the ability to take a punch. Trevor passes the task off to Kat, who soon finds herself the object of Danny’s affections.

“He comes in and just gets kind of, a little bit muddled for a while. And then I think people are going to have to see them film, see how it ends. See who ends up with who,” teased Smulders.

A running theme throughout Results has to do with the idea of money buying love or happiness. “Personally, money can’t buy me no love,” said Smulders, who started singing Beatles classic “Can’t Buy Me Love.” The actress went on to note that her character Kat, too, is more desirous of stability in her life than money. Pearce isn’t convinced that Trevor is motivated by money either.

“I think for him it’s more of about just expanding the trajectory that he think he’s on. That very sort of rigid and structured trajectory that he’s on,” Pearce told uInterview. “I think Trevor’s a little skewed in his vision of the world but I don’t think it’s about money as such.”

Preparation for playing the fitness buffs in Results wasn’t too difficult for Smulders or Pearce, who’ve both spent time at the gym with trainers. But, both actors acknowledged that their characters represent an almost hyperbolic example of the kind of people in the profession.

“You work in the film industry, so there’s a lot of highly strung control freaks that you’ve met,” Pearce said, noting that there were a lot of people he could draw on.

Smulders added, “I think that when you’re doing characters that seem like they’re a little bit exaggerated you have to find something that’s based in some sort of reality…. You just have to find it if you’re not that type of person like me. I’m like, “Why is she this upset?” And you have to kind of figure all that out.”

Results hits theaters in limited release May 29.


Q: How does your characters’ relationship evolve during the film? -

At the beginning of the film, we find Trevor and Cat. We kind of don’t really know what their relationship is. We know they work together and as we get into the film we realize that something has happened, there’s been some hookup, and they’re dealing with sort of the fall out of that, trying to be together as co workers – boss and employee really. So, then we meet Kevin Corrigan's character and he comes in and just gets kind of, a little bit muddled for a while. And then I think people are going to have to see them film, see how it ends. See who ends up with who.

GP: But it’s nice that it’s unconventional. You get a sense that there was some sort of history, but you don’t kind of know what it is, so I think that makes for an interesting story.

CS: There’s no cute-meet in our movie.

GP: So to speak.

CS: You know that term?

GP: No. I don’t know that term, cute meet.

CS: I hate that term, the cute meet. Am I the only one who know’s that?

GP: I’m gonna use that. How do you use it in a sentence? “We had a really cute meet.”

CS: Like “tell me your cute meet story.” And it’s like the story of how you met. We don’t have one.

GP: Ok.

CS: We don’t have one in this movie.

GP: I couldn’t imagine Andrew wanting to do a movie with a cute meet.

CS: I think that’s the right term. Now I’m like oh gosh maybe I said it wrong. Yeah, but it’s not Andrew Bujalski style to show a cute meet.

GP: Andrew Bujalski’s new movie, ‘Cute Meet.’

Q: Do your characters believe that money can buy happiness? And do you? -

CS: Personally, money can’t buy me no love.

GP: No me neither.

CS: But I think even in this film, as I’m thinking about like money with your character, I mean, I don’t think if he gets this gym and if he opens it’s gonna be…

GP: ...the be all and end all.

CS: Yeah, I think it’s going to be, like, this is my naive ending, but maybe Cat’s perspective is like, you just want to affect more people with your philosophy.

GP: I think for him it’s more of about just expanding the trajectory that he think he’s on. That very sort of rigid and structured trajectory that he’s on. I think Trevor’s a little skewed in his vision of the world but I don’t think it’s about money as such. I think it’s about if he was given the gym for free he’d take that as well.

CS: And I think more than money for Cat is finding some kind of stability. These are people that are working within the service industry, and if you can imagine your schedule being like you start your morning and you have like three people who cancel on you, you now have your day free, but you don’t have that money and it’s like you're always constantly shifting your life to suit other people’s needs. And I think that can be really really frustrating.

GP: And I think because of what the job is, when people cancel it’s usually because they’re feeling lazy. It’s not because they’ve got another appointment or something. So, on a philosophical level, she and all of our characters in this film and in the fitness world have to deal with sort of trying to motivate. And I think it’s about getting tired of motivating people.

Q: Were your characters modeled on anyone? -

GP: Well, I think for me, I’ve worked out in gyms for years and years and years, so there’s plenty of people I can draw on.

CS: Yeah, I’ve met some trainers.

GP: You work in the film industry, so there’s a lot of highly strung control freaks that you’ve met.

CS: Yes, that is true as well. It always amazes me like when you’re playing a character that you’re like, “Woah, I don’t know anyone who would react this way.” Or you’re trying to find an example in real life so you don’t feel like this is a little bit out of control, and then you see it happen. Like I’ve seen it happen where people really just lose it like that and it’s a real thing. I think that when you’re doing characters that seem like they're a little bit exaggerated you have to find something that’s based in some sort of reality or there is something that’s firing that, but you just have to find it if you’re not that type of person like me. I’m like, “Why is she this upset?” And you have to kind of figure all that out.