Danielle Panabaker goes all slasher-style in the Austin Chick film, Girls Against Boys. Usually a victim in movies such as Friday the 13th, Panabaker found herself doing the slashing this time around. The young actress had to dig deep into her character’s feelings. “I was trying to focus on being authentic to this character,” Panabaker told Uinterview exclusively. “I just wanted to be very truthful to my interpretation of what would happen and the stages of grief she’s going through.”

Panabaker, 25, was born in Augusta, Georgia. Recognizing her passion for acting early on in her life, she began acting in community theaters. Graduating from high school at a relatively young age of 14, she decided it was best to relocate to Los Angeles, to make her dream of becoming an actress a reality. She earned her B.A. from the University of California, and began appearing in TV commercials, as well as several television series such as CBS’s The Guardian. Panabaker has also starred in Friday the 13th in 2009, as one of Jason’s victims, and The Crazies. Up next for Panabaker is a role in Renaissance Girl, a romantic comedy to be released later in 2013.

For Panabaker, there is a lot more than just gore in Girls Against Boys — there’s also creating an emotional connection with her character who goes down a horrific psychological spiral. “I think everyone can relate to having that person they wish could make them understand the pain they cause them,” she told Uinterview.

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Panabaker Fights Back In New Film

Panabaker Fights Back In New Film

Panabaker stars as Shae, a vengeful rape victim in Austin Chick's 'Girls Against Boys.'
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Panabaker In 'Girls Against Boys'

Panabaker In 'Girls Against Boys'

Danielle Panabaker weighs her options after a brutal attack.
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Nicole LaLibertie Strikes A Pose

Nicole LaLibertie Strikes A Pose

Nicole LaLibertie stars alongside Panabaker as best friend Lu.
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Q: How did you get involved with the film? - Uinterview

I was working on another film, and I was really specifically looking for something much smaller, and much more of an emotional challenge, because I think it was where I was in my life, and that is what I was craving. And this came my way, and I took a look at it and I really loved that it left me asking questions and I was curious and I wanted to know more. So [director] Austin [Chick] and I hopped on Skype to chat and it was a great match.

Q: The movie has the feel of a grindhouse film. How did you and the director approach the material? - Uinterview

It's really interesting, but what was so attractive to me initially was the lack of actual over-the-top flooding gore that I feel like you see in this movie. I think that was Austin's intention from the beginning, if not to sort of hit you over the head with it, but to let you know, that's what was going on, so that was definitely a conversation we had. It just alternates on my own experience, coming from films that were filled with gore.

Q: There are some pretty crazy scenes in the movie, like when you're cutting off your rapist's feet. How did you go about filming that? - Uinterview

It's really ironic actually that you would bring up that scene. One of the difficulties in shooting with such a low budget is that you don't have money to throw around on props, so they ordered the two fake feet that I chopped off, and unfortunately, instead of sending a left foot and a right foot, they sent two left feet. Not only were two left feet sent, but they just didn't look very authentic, so that was a challenge of shooting that scene specifically. Michael [Stahl-David]'s character is tied to this bed and Nicole [LaLiberte] went to cut the ropes, and the props department came running and said, "No, no no! Don't cut it! We don't have anymore!" There would be no more rope for us to work with it. So, there were certainly physical challenges, but I think that actually worked to our benefit because a lot of the gore and gruesomeness happened off camera, you hear it and you know it's there, but you are not assaulted with it visually.

Q: The movie deals with a sexual assault. Was there any political message to it? And how do you balance that with the blood-and-guts aspect to it? - Uinterview

I don't know that I necessarily consider it as political. For me, I was trying to focus on being authentic to this character, the young woman who had gone through the assault and such a horrible experience that I've never personally been through. So I just wanted to be very truthful to my interpretation of what would happen and stages of grief she's going through and how sort of comatose she is.

Q: This movie has some similarites to Django Unchained – they both have that sort of revenge fantasy aspect to it. - Uinterview

Absolutely, that's something that I saw from the beginning and was really attracted to. I think everyone can relate to having that person that they wish could make them understand the pain they cause them. One of my favorite parts of the last scene is that you are left with a big question, I love that and it was great as an actor to get some work through that.

Q: You've been in quite a few of these thriller movies like Friday the 13th and The Ward. Are you attracted to this genre? - Uinterview

You know what? I'm attracted to work. The truth of the matter is that these are the films that get made and it's much easier to have a film made in this sort of genre, than those drama made. Ironically, I am certainly more attracted to the dramatic story telling, but I've been very fortunate in that I have gotten to a variety of different films in this genre. Friday the 13th was a great education to how the filmmakers create that world.