The long anticipated film Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them has finally hit the theaters, with fans and critics worldwide talking about the movie. Based on a J.K. Rowling book of the same name, the film revolves around some of the same characters and creatures that were introduced in the Harry Potter series. This alone drew many people to the theaters, but not all of them were equally impressed.

The movie’s budget was $180 million, and it featured great actors like Eddie Redmayne, Ezra Miller, Colin Farrell, Alison Sudol and Johnny Depp.

‘Fantastic Beasts’ Review Roundup

“The picture—directed by David Yates, who also gave us the last four Harry Potter films—feels both sprawling and crowded, as if it were trying to pack too much mythology into one cramped crawlspace.” – Stephanie ZacharekTime

“Some of the behind-the-scenes gang are back, including the director David Yates, who has brought some of his old Potter crew with him and gives this new machine a steady, smooth
hand. Steve Kloves, who adapted most of the Potter movies with a light, charmed touch, has returned as a producer, while Ms.Rowling has taken sole screenwriting credit. It’s no wonder that this fantasy — with its cheery enchantments and portentous inky swirls, its steely grays and tight pacing — feels familiar. We’ve been here, done that (at least some of it), except that this time
out the wizard isn’t a boy on the verge of manhood but a man idling in boyhood, Newt.” – Manohla Dargis, New York Times

“Fancy phony special effects aren’t enough to make a fantasy flick click. It also takes genuine heart to really cast a spell. J. K. Rowling’s “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” — her debut as a screenwriter — packs enough of both for moviegoing muggles.” – Joe Dziemianowicz, New York Daily News

“Beasts’ CGI menagerie tends to look a bit cheap and garish, but at its best — as with a golden, six-winged thunderbird that becomes the movie’s most majestic element, or in a show-offy speakeasy sequence that feels like a lost sidebar from Who Framed Roger Rabbit— the film brings back the anything-can-happen fantasy element and the sense of scope and surprise that initially made the Harry Potter stories compelling.” – Tasha Robinson, The Verge