The Killers have grabbed the brightside and aren’t going to let it go again with their new album, Day & Age. After the indie pop sensation of fast-paced, mighty youthful exuberance of their debut album, Hot Fuss (2004), everyone expected the band to continue on their tradition, clad in pop with ostentatious and overly confident lyrics. It was surprising then when Sam’s Town (2006) was released with that ’80s tradition of rocking the charts and then becoming “serious artists” that we all thought had passed. The Killers have finally found their medium between the two extremes in their newest album and possibly their best album.

 

With amazingly heartfelt songs that showcase lead singer Brandon Flower’s authentic, tender, and cathartic lyrics like “A Dustland Fairytale” in the mix with the fast-paced beats, irresistibly marketable lyrics, and glitzy horns of “Spaceman,” The Killers make their comeback in this album. They aren’t “Losing (their) Touch” with this electrifying album that doesn’t overdo their influences as they did in the pseudo-Springsteen Sam’s Town. There are hints of spry Duran Duran, catchy Blondie, reflective U2, and odd Bowie throughout the album, but the band’s voice shatters the glass. The occasionally silly lyrics spewing from Flowers make sense in an incomprehensible way as he evokes emotion through context not content. Between the heart-wrenching and dance-inspiring songs, there are their signature melodies to hook listeners in with funk saxophones, tartly and refreshing lyrics, and sensuous interpretations to remind everyone that they should have been born in the ’80s.

 

Overall, this is one of the best mainstream albums of the year, perfect for retro new wavers looking for a song to dance to in the car, jump to at a concert, or even write to in their rooms. Its 80s-inspired, grandstanding anthems don’t overshadow the solemnity, bijou trills discreteness. The Killers are coming out of their cage, and they are doing just fine.