Nick Cannon has been working to fulfill his promise to educate himself about anti-Semitism, less than one week after apologizing for hateful comments he made on his radio show.

Cannon visited the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles on Monday, where he learned about the work of the Center and Museum of Tolerance and discussed ways to work together and build bridges between the Jewish and Black communities, especially young people,” according to a museum press release. He pledged to donate his first paycheck from The Masked Singer to the museum, and discussed working with the museum’s media center “to promote tolerance and understanding between the Jewish and Black communities.”

While at the SWC, Cannon was shown The Hitler Letter, a letter written by Adolf Hitler himself in 1919, where he promised the “uncompromising removal of the Jews altogether.” Cannon also toured the Museum of Tolerance’s Witness To Truth exhibit, which shows portraits of Holocaust survivors and their stories.

Cannon spoke with Rabbi Abraham Cooper, who is the associate dean and global social action director of SWC, and put out the conversation in the latest edition of his podcast, Cannon’s Class.

“Hate is acquired through learning,” said Cooper in the clip Cannon shared on Twitter. “It’s taught, it’s not innate,” Cannon added.

The Masked Singer host found himself in hot water after he invited on Richard Griffin, also known as Professor Griff, onto his podcast. Griffin had been temporarily kicked out of the rap group Public Enemy in the 80s after he allegedly claimed that Jews were responsible “for the majority of wickedness that goes on across the globe.” On the podcast, the two perpetuated stereotypes and conspiracy theories about Jewish people.

Cannon was fired from his show Wild ‘N Out with ViacomCBS shortly after the the podcast was released. Cannon is still set to be the host of The Masked Singer with Fox, and his daytime talk show deal with Lionsgate has been postponed until next year.