Natalie Dormer, who stars in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, recently shared her personal feelings about the often-discussed nudity in Game of Thrones.

Natalie Dormer On ‘GOT’ Nude Scenes

As Margaery Tyrell on Game of Thrones, the young woman who’s remained a virgin following two unconsummated marriage and a betrothal to a boy king, Dormer had less of an occasion to get nude for the show that many of her female – and some of her male – costars. Dormer, echoing sentiments of some of the other actors on the HBO show, thinks the show is pretty equal in showing its male and female characters in the nude – but wouldn’t be opposed to more male nudity.

“During the first season Alfie [Allen], Richard [Madden], and several of the men got naked—although not all the way,” Dormer told The Daily Beast, referring to the actors who play Theon Greyjoy and Robb Stark, respectively. “I suppose it’s just the rules of broadcast television, isn’t it? I think Thrones has been better than your average show with the equality, but they could definitely ramp it up! Absolutely.”

Earlier this year, Dormer’s Game of Thrones costar Rose Leslie addressed criticism that the hit show is sexist, completely shutting down the idea in an exclusive interview with uInterview.

“I feel that Game of Thrones is most certainly at the forefront of, not only on television, but also in promoting strong, dominant women,” Leslie told uInterview, “particularly in a very brutal and ruthless world where by even in this brutal world, there are men who answer to women and there are powerful women, who, you know have on there back and these women can dominate and I think that’s’ a wonderful platform.”

These days, while Dormer enjoys playing women like Game of Thrones‘ Margaery who have sexual power, she is looking to expand her range of roles, which she’s done in Mockingjay as intense reporter Cressida. Today, Dormer believes, the movie industry has generally become more openminded in casting women in traditionally male parts.

“What I love about Mockingjay–Part 1 is that President Coin or Cressida could have easily been played by a man,” Dormer said, “and if you look at Interstellar, the Anne Hathaway or Jessica Chastain roles would have been men years ago. I’m glad that cinema is catching up to what television has known for a while: that three-dimensional, complex women get an audience engaged as much as the men.”