Marton Csokas on ‘Voice From The Stone’, Emilia… by Uinterview

Morton Csokas plays Klaus in the new film Voices from the Stone, the story of a young boy, Jakob, (Edward Dring) who’s gone mute after the death of his mother and the nurse, Verena, (Emilia Clarke) who tries to bring him back to life. Klaus, the father of the young boy, is also dealing with the grief of losing his wife could benefit from the nurses’ presence as well.

Csokas sat down with uInterview to discuss the film and his experience making it.

His character, at the beginning of the film, is having quite a tough time with the loss of his wife, and the whole world of the film reflects it.

“There’s a big old house, adorned with mist and what have you – and it represents the psychological state of everybody who dwells in the house,” Csokas explains. “The wife of my character and the mother of Jakob’s character has died and he is in a state of trauma and grief.”

Then comes Verena, Clarke’s character, who does what she can to get life back on track for the grieving boys. Csokas explains that he had a lovely time working with Clarke. “What was lovely about the whole film, including that relationship, was the collaborative nature of how we worked, and that doesn’t always happen. We colluded, and it was enjoyable, it was a pleasure,” Csokas told uInterview.

The same can be said for Csokas on-screen son, Dring, who was nine-years-old when the film began shooting. “I met with [Dring’s] family and spent some time just hanging out. He has an intensity about him and a very rich imagination.”

For his part, despite the darkness of the film and his character, Csokas said his favorite scene in the movie is one in which he starts to reveal his character to Clarke.

“The scene I liked the best was the piano scene with Emilia discussing what his relationship with his wife and his child was. That unveiling of some of his heart.”

Voices from the Stone is available for purchase online through Amazon, iTunes, and YouTube. Watch the trailer below.


Q: Where is your character at the onset of the film? -

It is set in Italy and has a gothic/horror tone so it's painted in those colors. At the house - there's a big old house, adorned with mist and what have you - and it represents the psychological state of everybody who dwells in the house. The wife of my character and the mother of Jakob's character has died and he is in a state of trauma and grief. In comes Verena and she wields her alchemical response to all of this grief.

Q: What was it like working with Emilia Clarke? -

What I remember most of all is the pleasure of working with Emilia. We got on very well. She does her thing, I do mine, everybody works in a different way. What was lovely about the whole film, including that relationship, was the collaborative nature of how we worked, and that doesn't always happen. We colluded and it was enjoyable, it was a pleasure. What Emilia brings to the film is a constancy, underplayed, you might say, but also, she has lots and lots of color, and range and pitch within that restraint.

Q: How was working with Edward Dring -

Eddy was a typical young boy who was distracted...like I am. Distracted by all kinds of things and was like 'I don't want to do this for the thirteenth time,' and yeah, well 'I get that, but we have to.' So it was a lot of play, which sometimes was successful and sometimes was not. He's very complex, as a young person should be. We hung out a bit, we played a bit. I met with his family and spent some time just hanging out. He has an intensity about him and a very rich imagination.

Q: Do you have a favorite scene from the film? -

The scene I liked the best was the piano scene with Emilia discussing what his relationship with his wife and his child was. That unveiling of some of his heart.