Lady Gaga went to Washington Tuesday to meet with Senior White House officials and discuss the issue of teen bullying. Gaga was not able to meet with President Obama this time, as he was out of town giving a speech on the economy, though the two did cross paths in September at a fundraiser, where Gaga thanked Obama for hosting an anti-bullying conference.

Obama senior advisor Valerie Jarrett said she and Gaga discussed ways to prevent bullying in schools and praised the pop star for her tireless efforts toward the cause. "Lady Gaga is a source of strength for many young people who feel isolated and scared at their schools. Today, I had the opportunity to welcome her to the White House, where we discussed ways we could work together to make sure that no child comes under attack, regardless of his or her race, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other factor," Jarrett wrote on the White House web site. "Lady Gaga has described this cause as a personal one — she has said that as a child, she was often picked on for being different. I am deeply moved by the way she has used her story, and her success, to inspire young people, and shine the spotlight on important issues."

Gaga has described her anti-bullying campaign as a "passion project" that she and her mom care a lot about — particularly since stories have emerged about young LGBT teens attempting or committing suicide due to bullying at school. When Jamey Rodemeyer, 14, took his life in September after alleged anti-gay bullying, Gaga tweeted, "The past days I've spent reflecting, crying, and yelling. I have so much anger. It is hard to feel love when cruelty takes someones life."

Rather than stew in her anger and frustration, Gaga chose instead to do something about it and found the Born This Way Foundation, which will focus on anti-bullying initiatives. Jarret noted that the White House was committed to working with Gaga on the issue in the future. "As we continue protecting our children, we look forward to working with Lady Gaga, the Born This Way Foundation, and with every American who is willing to help make our society more kind, inclusive, and equal," Jarrett said.