Kylie Jenner’s wild look from Monday night’s Schiaparelli fashion show has polarized animal lovers and activists.

The new mom showed up to the Paris show wearing a black velvet gown that featured a hyperrealistic, life-sized lion head atop her shoulder. Her elaborate ensemble was a pre-release from the couture collection that debuted on the runway that evening, inspired by Dante’s Inferno.

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Some have criticized Jenner and the fashion house for its use of animals, although faux, in the new collection. On a recent post from the Schiaparelli Instagram account, some high-profile critics took to the comment section to express their disdain for the “Leo couture” look.

“This is disgusting,” singer Marina Diamandis commented.

One model wrote that the look was “so sad” while an animal activist called it “repulsive.”

“Regardless of whether the animal heads are real or replicas, they promote trophy hunting, which is obviously disgusting, violent and non-progressive,” user Amy Soranno wrote.

Zoologist and BBC presenter Dan O’Neill posted to his stories with his thoughts about the looks, calling them “really, really ugly.”

“Some 80% of snow leopards were killed after the fall of the Soviet Union in parts of their range. Many of those killed were sold to the Russian fashion industry,” he wrote. “That’s not beautiful. Living breathing snow leopards are though, and the beauty in their fur is its ability to insulate a cat to temperatures below -40C. Wrapped around a model ain’t all that is it…”

Despite the backlash, animal rights activist organization PETA called the line “fabulously innovative.”

“Kylie, Naomi and Irina’s looks celebrate the beauty of wild animals and may be a statement against trophy hunting, in which lions and wolves are torn apart to satisfy human egotism,” PETA’s president Ingrid Newkirk told Page Six. “We encourage everyone to stick with 100% cruelty-free designs that showcase human ingenuity and prevent animal suffering.”

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