Justin Bieber’s new album “Changes” has received mixed reviews from critics. It has 16 tracks and marks a change from what the Canadian pop-star has previously produced. It’s more R&B than pop and many of the songs focus on Bieber’s refuge from celebrity life with wife Hailey Baldwin after a documentary based on Bieber’s creative and personal life, “Seasons,” showed him struggling with fame. The album contains features from Post Malone, Travis Scott, Kehlani, Summer Walker, Lil Dicky, Clever and Quavo. The album’s tour is scheduled to begin May 14 2020.

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The L.A. Times said, “The singer makes yet another cocoon for himself on “Changes,” a low-key set of gentle electro-R&B jams that depicts his relationship with Baldwin as a refuge from the unkind world he’s still not quite ready to reenter.”

The Independent wrote, “This isn’t so much an album that would rile you to the point of turning it off. Rather, it washes over you, with its mostly average beats and seemingly random cluster of guest features.”

NME wrote that “Bieber’s limp comeback results in a collection of loved-up songs lacking innovation or substance.” It also said that the album is “a knackering, loved-up slog lacking substance,” that is “overly reliant on trendy production and profound(ish) romantic proclamations, it’s a disappointing comeback from an artist who has a track record in creating hits. It may be an album filled with sex jams and lovelorn lyrics, but sadly this is one romp that never reaches climax.”

The Evening Standard said that the focus on Hailey Baldwin detracted from the album’s appeal: “”In fact, so single-minded is his approach this time that it feels like she’s [Hailey Baldwin] his only intended audience. The arena crowds on his summer tour of North America are going to be underwhelmed by the unchanging, lounging pace of the new material, gently ticking beats and lack of memorable choruses. The production, mostly from Jason “Poo Bear” Boyd, is smooth, pretty and tasteful. The weighty bass and cut-up voices of “Take It Out on Me” are intriguing, but otherwise he rarely does much to leap out from behind Bieber’s crooning.”