The partner of the late Gianni Versace, Antonio D’Amico, says that Ryan Murphy‘s latest American Crime Story is a “misrepresentation” of the truth.

ANTONIO D’AMICO SAYS AMERICAN CRIME STORY IS FICTION

D’Amico blasted the FX series, saying that “significant parts of the [series] on Gianni Versace’s murder do not reflect the reality of the events that took place.” D’Amico, 59, added, “I feel — together with those who know me well — that my character… is a misrepresentation of myself and what our relationship with was like.”

In the series, Versace is played by Edgar Ramirez and D’Amico by Ricky Martin. Specifically, D’Amico is speaking about the scene in which the killer Andrew Cunanan, played by Darren Criss, meets Versace onstage in San Francisco. The scene, which is told from Cunanan’s perspective, “is pure fantasy,” D’Amico told People. “I was with Gianni — together with a number of people, like the ladies from the San Francisco Opera council — for the entire time he was at the theatre and then we went back to our hotel together. I remember it clearly because it was quite an event,” he continued. “That supposed meeting never took place. At least not on that day and in that setting. Just an aside, Gianni did not drink alcohol — everyone knew that — so even the champagne scene with Cunanan is fictitious.”

The Versace family has already discredited the story told in American Crime Story as being far from the truth. “The Versace family has neither authorized nor had any involvement whatsoever in the forthcoming TV series about the death of Mr. Gianni Versace. Since Versace did not authorize the book on which it is partly based nor has it taken part in the writing of the screenplay, this TV series should only be considered as a work of fiction,” read a statement from the family.

D’Amico added a few more issues he took with the show. “Neither Gianni nor I were looking to get married or to have children,” he said. “All we wanted was to live our relationship in the open — as we did. We were more than happy to have the nieces and nephews that we had and were not seeking children of our own.”