The S&M / bondage-themed erotic fiction book that everyone's buzzing about, Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James — inspired by fanfiction written about Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series — has already had its movie rights purchased by Universal Pictures in association with Focus Features, but now there's a talk show set to air on Lifetime set to the "mommy porn" tune of Fifty Shades of Grey. The series will be hosted by British photographer and mother of three Amanda de Cadenet, 39, and produced by Demi Moore's company.

The show, called The Conversation, will open up the sex discussion to some of Hollywood's biggest female celebrities, reports the New York Post. "I watched the firestorm, the domino effect of the very first woman in my circle to admit having read Fifty Shades of Grey," said Lifetime President Nancy Dubuc. "And it took about 6.3 seconds for the other 50 women to admit that they had read it, too."

The whole endeavor reflects Lifetime's attempt to spice up its women-in-crisis image. Part of the programming effort includes the show 7 Days of Sex, which will be paired with The Conversation on Thursday nights and follows married couples who heat things up in the bedroom as an attempt to save their troubled marriages. Add to that The Client List, starring Jennifer Love Hewitt as a working girl / stripper.

"We are in a cultural movement," says Dubuc. "Literally and figuratively, women are coming out of the closet about how they feel and asking tough questions, which is what this show is about." Some of the celebs who will get down-and-dirty in their conversation on The Conversation? Gwyneth Paltrow, Sarah Silverman, Zoe Saldana and Jane Fonda will kick off the first episode, "Love & Loss," premiering on April 26.

Based on her eagerness to talk about Fifty Shades of Grey on Monday's episode of The View, maybe Barbara Walters should think of throwing in her hat as a future guest.

Watch the clip from The View here:

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1 Comments

  • Mijon Zulu
    Mijon Zulu on

    I love how women in the 40s and 50s are beginning to drive popular culture.

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