Surprising new details emerge about the troubled life of Aaron Hernandez, despite the fact that Hernandez committed suicide more than two years ago. Dennis SanSoucie, childhood friend and former high school teammate of Hernandez, has revealed that the two of them had a secret gay relationship throughout their high school careers.

In an interview with Investigation Discovery, SanSoucie opened up about the details of his relationship with Hernandez. SanSoucie said that he and Hernandez were close friends during their childhood, but this friendship, “progressed to just more than friends,” by the time the two reached middle school. This relationship continued into their high school years, where SanSoucie says that his relationship with Hernandez had become sexual. “We didn’t want anyone to know,” said SanSoucie about the relationship, adding that, “We were just in complete denial of what was really going on.” SanSoucie believes that if his teammates found out about the sexual relationship between Hernandez and himself, their “lives would be ruined.”

After high school, Hernandez was picked by the New England Patriots to play as a tight end starting in the 2010 season. His career was cut short when he was accused of murdering Odin Llyod in 2013. In 2014, while still being investigated for Lloyd’s murder, Hernandez was indicted for a 2012 double homicide. In 2015, Hernandez was found guilty of killing Lloyd and was sentenced to life without parole. In April of 2017, he was acquitted for the double homicide, but just a few days later, he committed suicide by hanging himself with a bed sheet in his jail cell.

After his death, it was revealed that Hernandez suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a condition that results from brain injury. Dr Ann McKee, a director of Boston University’s CTE Center, said of Hernandez’s case that, “In any individual we can’t take the pathology and explain the behavior. But we can say collectively, in our collective experience, individuals with CTE and CTE of this severity have difficulty with impulse control, decision-making, inhibition of impulses or aggression, often emotional volatility and rage behaviors.”

A new Netflix documentary, set to be released on January 15, is going to examine the life and death of Hernandez.